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20131202
20131210
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. unemployment, and poverty continue to be real issues for the country, this many years now, with the anc, at the head of the political weather. >> you know, it is a combination of things. i think worldwide jobs, and labor, have -- it's a very difficult period worldwide for those but in south africa it is a place of great deal idealism, that's been cheated of it's democratic birthright in many ways. by corruption, by nepotism, and by lack of concern for those small people that have been called that nelson la used to understand were the bedrock of what makes a nation. >> well, and it is good to talk to you, greg. at this moment in time, i thank you for your insights and your thoughts on the passing of nelson mandela, and these are pictures from johan news burg outside the house. nelson mandela, the u.n. secretary general, was he making a statement of the passing, just let me know. let me bring in my colleague morgan ratford. lived and talks -- i did not know this, in south africa. morgan, what are your thoughts in. >> there was in 2010, i was there as a full right and i taught at the unive
reel seat of the anc. he was arrested again in nineteen sixty two and try to present iphone type activities. then it was sentenced to life imprisonment in nineen sixty four would end up spending more than a quarter of this entry behind bars this involved a minute opinion polls will make a town moment that it was imprisoned lisa curry poignant shook the country in nineteen seventy six government forces saw dozens of youth and school children who would demonstrate in custody in stewart st. in the nineteen nineties demonstrations and police find its continued state of emergency was declared the country's currency collapsed. meanwhile the anti apartheid movement picked up momentum the board's announcement that it became its living single. several musicians great songs in his armor and writing history the month that it was eventually transferred to pick suppose to prison in nineteen ninety eight when he meets guilty secret negotiations with the government. in nineteen ninety the ban on gays he was lifted to dump every eleven combat team into the warm temps a free man . then it was el
's. my husband was a pat, pan african congress, mr. mandela was founder of anc, african national congress, others south african national union. i was used to those men and a few women shouting and screaming at each other. they were really arch rivals. when mr. mandela came, he didn't raise his voice. he didn't argue with anybody. he didn't put anybody down. they were rivals. i had never met a south african who wasn't shouting and really angry all the time. i know he was angry, but he didn't use his energy foolishly. so it was a year after that he was imprisoned. i became friends with his wife then, winnie mandela. and we continued to support each other over the years and over the oceans. and she would tell me how he was. he wasn't vitt uperative with t guards. i was part of hillary clinton's delegates when he was inaugurated. i sat there and watched the guards, who had guarded him for 27 years, sitting in the right sights, in the best seats, invited by mr. mandela. not to say look how you treated me. i'm free now and i can ya ya ya at you, not that at all. in fact, he was gracious, welcom
fantastic, so jail didn't hurt them. nelson mandela picked up that movement, at the anc. he was influenced by gandhi, and as that movement continues after gandhi went back to india, my family continues as part of the antiapartheid movement. and lost business as a result of they role. but we returned my family returned before the election, were were all given citizen ship. i am a sout african citizes well. and we have shared in this new beginning, which everybody looses hope in, but the fact is nelson mandela avoidedded a blood bath a civil war, and he create add remarkable nation. >> he spent time with the african national congress when it was in excite, stephen, give us your thoughts tonight. >> well, it is a very sad moment. this was a great man. it was true, in some ways her understated not just to dignity, and not just perseverance. but what he was able to exhibit when he took the country forward. there would be no rainbow nation today. i think he was essential for the progress of south africa to becoming what we would regard today as the civilized part of the world. >> obviously he ha
called at that time the anc terrorists and when he came out of prison, when he said i say to you all, take your guns, your knives, your pangers and throw them into the sea, fully declaring in his first -- practically his first public address after 28 years of being in the wilderness in prison, no, this has to be peaceful. this was huge and then you know, you heard president zuma say this is the father, the founding father of our democratic south africa, and you heard robyn talk about the tribal homeland where he lived and the rural area where he's going to be finally laid to rest, and i think i will never forget the pictures not just of the snaking lines of hundreds of thousands of millions of people in the towns and the cities who cast their ballots for nelson mandela in 1994, but the helicopter shots of the countryside, when people were literally lining up in zigzag lines so quietly, so peacefully, so joyfully, just to have the privilege of casting their first ever vote in 1994, this majority black country, they had never had that right before and they stepped up to the plate. ther
understand from many high ranking anc officials homeland security continues to treat some of them as needing a waiver to get into the united states, which is an embarrassment and what secretary rice said today, at the time, we can't allow president mandela, a man of his stature to be continue to be treated as a terrorist by the united states. we needed to do this and do it before he passed away. but also, we need to honor his memory today by also making sure that homeland security honors of legislation that secretary kerry and for that matter senator obama when they were both senators, helped to pass. so, yes, officially they are off the terror list but the way in which homeland security continues to interpret the laws, they are creating problems for the united states. >> that history is a reminder as we're in a moment of what we call international unity, the foreign policy legacy of everything related to the apartheid regime was divided in this country and many other nations. you look at say the early origins of investment campaign where a young barack obama as a student was involved, many
that in time. but as you note, many regimes, many governments saw him and the anc as terrorists and responded accordingly. >> one of the things that's always struck me about nelson mandela's life was here was a guy who could have had the ultimate chip on his shoulder. and not once did you ever see or hear or read about public bitterne bitterness. nelson mandela never displayed any sort of public bitterness. >> i think nelson mandela, consistent with martin luther king and gandhi and others, i think recognized when he emerged from that prison cell that if he were going to lead south africa, he needed a message not only of reconciliation but of a multiracial south africa. and he did a great job in presenting that message. and i think he surprised people that when he emerged from 27 years of imprisonment, i don't think anyone can imagine what it would be like to spend that much time in a narrow jail cell, to be cut off and then to come back and be so lucid, so politically astute, so politically aware and really emerge as one of the great leaders of our times. >> donald, when we talk about mandel
and the anc during his long imprisonment and democrats had supported sanctions on south africa so he wanted to be there, he wanted to be at our convention. he later came to the inauguration. and then hillary and vice president gore led a delegation to his inauguration in '94 and just five months later, he came to the united states on a state visit. that's when we really started becoming friends and i had the honor of working with him throughout the entire span of his presidency and one of the things that sometimes gets lost in the incredible personal impact he made on the world because of the way he handled imprisonment is that he was a very, very good president. i think he was an extremely effective president of south africa. >> i remember when you and hillary clinton and the first lady toured that robben island cell where he had spent so many years back in 1998. what was that like? >> well, it was amazing. he talked to me about it and i'll never forget, one of the most enduring conversations i had with him over the many we had in our 20 year friendship was i said you know, i know how you
of the a.n.c. during the '60s, who died and perhaps was killed by the south african government. a person with home your viewers may be aware of steve, murderedered in 1977. >> as we move forward and look at south africa and the issues and problems do you feel the legacy and mess age has been >> the legacy, and it goes back to the same people who fathered the youth league. south africa must be a place in which there's self determination. it goes back to the congress, going back to all who lives within it, everyone that participates in the governing structure. >> thank you for your insight. we appreciate it. >> french president issued a veiled warning to the leader of the central african republic. francis hollande warned it would be tough to keep central african republic's president in place given the worsening violence. 400 bodies have been found in the capital in the past three days. 10,000 fled the city. everyone has been ordered off the streets bar peacekeepers and bars. some images from this report may be disturbing. >> french soldiers on foot patrol in bangui. this is new to the city
'm a loyal member of the anc. the world had changed and had to go away from the socialist philosophy. he changed radically in a very short amount of time. one of the things he always said to me, he was never high bound about haenging his mind. he said when circumstances change i changed my mind. what do you do. another great lesson for politicians. so he evolved so tremendously when he came out of prison. it was astonishing to watch. >> it is astonishing. incredible story. >> the transition between icon to being in power is one of those impossible things to do. >> it was much more difficult coming out of prison and being a practical politician than being in prison. mandela's greatest teacher said i haven't had a good night's sleep since i left prison because now have responsibility. >> in 1994 brian williams interviewed nelson mandela. he asked him about his predecessor f.w. de klerk. >> my relationship with mr. de klerk and he's one of those south africans that i hold in high regard. we have had differences where we said cruel things to each other but at the end of the day, we're able t
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10